Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Revelry, Rivalry, and Longing for the Goddesses of BengalThe Fortunes of Hindu Festivals$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Rachel Fell McDermott

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780231129190

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231129190.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Devī in the Diaspora

Devī in the Diaspora

Chapter:
(p.224) 9 Devī in the Diaspora
Source:
Revelry, Rivalry, and Longing for the Goddesses of Bengal
Author(s):

Rachel Fell McDermott

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231129190.003.0009

This chapter focuses on the Pūjā committees and celebrations of the American diaspora and the transformations occurring in the homes of Bengali immigrants. The chapter asks: to what extent are rivalry, innovation, longing, and linkage of the goddesses with the land of Bengal to be found in contexts outside India? With material derived from nearly thirty visits to Durgā, Jagaddhātrī, and Kālī Pūjās in New York and New Jersey, this chapter illustrates that Durgā and Kālī—and to a lesser extent Jagaddhātrī—appear to be flourishing in their new diasporic contexts in North America. As in India and Bangladesh, so here: the Goddess is a national symbol of what it means to be a Hindu Bengali, and in celebrating her, Bengali devotees proclaim and nourish their own sense of identity.

Keywords:   Pūjā, American diaspora, Bengali immigrants, New York, New Jersey, Hindu Bengali, identity, national symbol

Columbia Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .