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Global PopulationHistory, Geopolitics, and Life on Earth$
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Alison Bashford

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231147668

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231147668.001.0001

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Migration

Migration

World Population and the Global Color Line

Chapter:
(p.107) 4 Migration
Source:
Global Population
Author(s):

Alison Bashford

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231147668.003.0004

This chapter discusses the issue of migration and mass movement, as the regulation of territory and the global distribution of peoples fall into considerable debate, especially among staunch nationalists, liberal internationalists, and lebensraum theorists alike. Inevitably, a global movement of people would entail immigration and emigration restrictions, and more broadly, the problem of racial discrimination. Early legislations on immigration had been passed in several U.S., British, and Australasian nations in an effort to establish a “color line” at national borders, in response to a perceived rapid increase in population growth in Asian nations. Although reliable statistics to prove the latter notion were difficult to come by at the time, it nevertheless encapsulated the modern geopolitics of population, in establishing world population problems as being world migration problems, too.

Keywords:   migration, global movement, immigration, emigration, racial discrimination, color line, population growth, world migration problems, world population problems, geopolitics of population

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