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Fossil Mammals of AsiaNeogene Biostratigraphy and Chronology$
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Mikael Fortelius, Xiaoming Wang, and Lawrence Flynn

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231150125

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231150125.001.0001

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A Review of the Neogene Succession of the Muridae and Dipodidae from Anatolia, with Special Reference to Taxa Known from Asia and/or Europe

A Review of the Neogene Succession of the Muridae and Dipodidae from Anatolia, with Special Reference to Taxa Known from Asia and/or Europe

Chapter:
(p.566) Chapter 26 A Review of the Neogene Succession of the Muridae and Dipodidae from Anatolia, with Special Reference to Taxa Known from Asia and/or Europe
Source:
Fossil Mammals of Asia
Author(s):

Hans De Bruijn

Engin Ünay

Kees Hordijk

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231150125.003.0026

This chapter analyzes the Neogene succession of the Muridae and Dipodidae families of rodents from Anatolia, with particular emphasis on taxa known from Asia and/or Europe. The latest Oligocene/earliest Miocene assemblages contain seven genera that are neither known from older levels nor from other areas. These genera might be immigrants from the Iranian block. This chapter begins with an overview of the Early Miocene assemblages of Muridae and Dipodidae, along with their assemblages in the Middle and Late Miocene as well as Pliocene. It then describes the biostratigraphical correlation of the assemblages of Muridae and Dipodidae from Anatolia with successions from Europe and China. It also examines the distribution patterns and migrations of Neogene Muridae and Dipodidae.

Keywords:   Neogene succession, Muridae, Dipodidae, Anatolia, taxa, Asia, Europe, Neogene, assemblages, rodents

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