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Creating a Learning Society
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Creating a Learning Society: A New Approach to Growth, Development, and Social Progress

Joseph Stiglitz and Bruce Greenwald

Abstract

This book assesses how learning helps countries grow, develop, and become more productive. It looks at what government can do to promote learning and casts light on the significance of learning for economic theory and policy. It explains that the thing that truly separates developed from less-developed countries is not just a gap in resources or output but a gap in knowledge. It shows that the pace at which developing countries grow is largely a function of the pace at which they close this knowledge gap. The book takes as its starting point Kenneth J. Arrow's 1962 paper “Learning by Doing,” a ... More

Keywords: learning society, economic theory, Kenneth Arrow, Learning by Doing, knowledge, endogenous growth

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2014 Print ISBN-13: 9780231152143
Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015 DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231152143.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Joseph Stiglitz, author
Columbia University

Bruce Greenwald, author

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Contents

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Introduction

Joseph E. Stiglitz and Bruce C. Greenwald

Part One Creating a Learning Society

Part Two Analytics

Part Three Policies for a Learning Society

Part Four Commentary and Afterword

Chapter Eighteen Introductory Remarks for the First Annual Arrow Lecture

Michael Woodford John Bates Clark Professor of Political Economy, Columbia University

Chapter Nineteen Further Considerations

Joseph E. Stiglitz and Bruce C. Greenwald

Chapter Twenty Commentary

Philippe Aghion Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics, Harvard University

Chapter Twenty-One Commentary

Robert Solow Institute Professor Emeritus, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Chapter Twenty-Two Commentary

Kenneth J. Arrow Professor Emeritus, Stanford University

Afterword

Philippe Aghion Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics, Harvard University