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Speaking for BuddhasScriptural Commentary in Indian Buddhism$
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Richard Nance

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780231152303

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231152303.001.0001

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Models of Speaking

Models of Speaking

Buddhas and Monks

Chapter:
(p.14) One Models of Speaking
Source:
Speaking for Buddhas
Author(s):

Richard F. Nance

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231152303.003.0001

This chapter analyzes the concept of “right speech” expressed in Buddhist texts by looking at two normative models. The first is prescriptive, which provides a guide to what, when, where, and how one should speak; while the second, proscriptive, is a handbook on what, when, where, and how one should not speak. These two models are developed through a close inspection of texts likely well known to Buddhist commentators working in large Indian monastic conglomerates during the mid-to-late first millennium: Mātṛceṭa's Śatapañcāśatka and Catuḥśataka, and the Prātimokṣasūtra. These texts seem to be included among the first memorized by Buddhist monastic apprentices, and they likely served as resources from which monks drew many of their premises regarding proper modes of speech.

Keywords:   Buddhist texts, right speech, Buddhist commentators, Mātṛceṭa, Śatapañcāśatka, Catuḥśataka, Prāimokṣasūtra

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