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The Kitchen as LaboratoryReflections on the Science of Food and Cooking$
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César Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231153454

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231153454.001.0001

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Restructuring Pig Trotters

Restructuring Pig Trotters

Fine Chemistry Supporting the Creative Culinary Process

Chapter:
(p.217) Twenty-seven Restructuring Pig Trotters
Source:
The Kitchen as Laboratory
Author(s):

Jorge Ruiz

Julia Calvarro

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231153454.003.0028

This chapter discusses the preparation of stuffed pig trotters (pig's feet). Boiled pig trotters with tomato, garlic, onion, bay leaves, parsley, pepper, blood, and fermented sausage (chorizo) is a traditional dish in Extremadura and several other regions of Spain. A modified version of this dish is part of the menu served at Restaurant Atrio, in Cáceres, Spain, whose kitchen is run by chef Antonio Perez. His version of this dish is challenging in terms of the lack of structure of the cooked trotters: they frequently fall apart during cooking, which makes them unsuitable for serving. The authors visited Perez to discuss the details of his culinary problem with the intent of finding a solution. It was obvious that the disintegration of the trotter during cooking could not be avoided. In fact, the final texture of the dish relies on a thorough softening of the trotter. This led them to suggest a series of restructuring strategies that, within the context of this dish, could be referred to as meat glues.

Keywords:   science-based cooking, pig trotters, pig's feet, meat glue

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