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The Kitchen as LaboratoryReflections on the Science of Food and Cooking$
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César Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231153454

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231153454.001.0001

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Eating Is Believing

Eating Is Believing

Chapter:
(p.233) Twenty-nine Eating Is Believing
Source:
The Kitchen as Laboratory
Author(s):

Line Holler Mielby

Michael Bom Frøst

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231153454.003.0030

This chapter begins with the author's account of eating an entire meal in total darkness at Unsicht-Bar in Hamburg, Germany. He says that when we are deprived of one of our key senses, our impression of the world can change radically. In connection with eating, visual input generates expectations about what is to come. In the absence of these expectations, our other sensory impressions of food are dramatically altered. The chapter then discusses the complexity of the eating experience; how our expectations influence our experience of a meal; the effect of restaurant settings on consumer perception; and experimental studies in restaurant settings.

Keywords:   eating, dining, Unsicht-Bar, consumer perception, consumer expectations, restaurant settings

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