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The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical MonkPracticing Buddhism in Modern Thailand$
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Justin McDaniel

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231153775

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231153775.001.0001

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Art and Objects

Art and Objects

Chapter:
(p.161) 4. Art and Objects
Source:
The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical Monk
Author(s):

Justin Thomas McDaniel

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231153775.003.0004

This chapter discusses the significance of art in Thai Buddhism. Thai Buddhism is lauded for its age and precious objects, which are honored for their connection to certain powerful monks, their relics, their power to heal, or their power to protect. Many of these highly revered and powerful images are reproduced on resin or wood, crudely and mass-produced bronze, plastic, copper, resin, or clay. Moreover, these images demand a response and reaction. Patrons do not merely look at or prostrate before images; they affix gold, insert relics, draw holy water, as well as comfort images with robes, pillows, food, and flowers.

Keywords:   Thai Buddhism, Buddhist art, Buddhist relics, Buddhist images, Buddhist patrons

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