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The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical MonkPracticing Buddhism in Modern Thailand$
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Justin McDaniel

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231153775

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231153775.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.222) Conclusion
Source:
The Lovelorn Ghost and the Magical Monk
Author(s):

Justin Thomas McDaniel

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231153775.003.0005

This chapter concludes that the magical, commercial, curative, protective, prognosticative, aesthetic, and preservative practices of current Thai Buddhists are neither the products of an anarchic society nor the expressions of the futile aspirations of those ignorant of more refined canonical values. The origin of these practices can be best explained through the notion of repertoire—a constantly shifting collection of gestures, objects, texts, plots, tropes, ethical maxims, precepts, ritual movements, and expectations that any individual agent employs and draws upon when acting and explaining action—focusing on individual agents and the relationships that are formed between them, and examining closely at their religious products (texts, rituals, liturgies, art) in highly specific contexts.

Keywords:   Thai Buddhists, Thai Buddhists practice, Thai Buddhists texts, Thai Buddhists rituals, Thai Buddhists liturgies, Thai Buddhists art

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