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The Quest for SecurityProtection Without Protectionism and the Challenge of Global Governance$
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Joseph Stiglitz and Mary Kaldor

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231156868

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231156868.001.0001

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Restructuring Global Security for the Twenty-First Century*

Restructuring Global Security for the Twenty-First Century*

Chapter:
(p.117) 5 Restructuring Global Security for the Twenty-First Century*
Source:
The Quest for Security
Author(s):

Mary Kaldor

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231156868.003.0005

This chapter makes the case for a profound restructuring in the global security sector away from a preoccupation with national and bloc security, largely based on conventional military forces, toward a strengthened global security system with greatly enhanced integrated civilian-military capabilities aimed at addressing the everyday insecurities experienced in the world today. The term “human security” is used to describe the goals and methods of such a new global security system. The term provides a way of framing security that mobilizes popular support and that establishes a cohesive concept that could help to bring together diverse and complex multilateral institutions. In particular, “human security” offers a clear alternative to the War on Terror as an organizing narrative for global security. The chapter starts by describing some of the key characteristics of contemporary forms of violence. It then outlines what a human security approach would involve. The final section makes some recommendations for the strategy in Afghanistan, which could make or break a human security approach.

Keywords:   global security, national security, civilian-military capabilities, human security, violence, foreign policy

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