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The Therapist in MourningFrom the Faraway Nearby$
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Kerry Malawista and Anne Adelman

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231156998

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231156998.001.0001

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The Death of the Analyst, the Death of the Analytic Community, and Bad Conduct

The Death of the Analyst, the Death of the Analytic Community, and Bad Conduct

Chapter:
(p.178) Chapter 10 The Death of the Analyst, the Death of the Analytic Community, and Bad Conduct
Source:
The Therapist in Mourning
Author(s):

Robert M. Galatzer-Levy

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231156998.003.0011

This chapter looks into the communal response to the problem of the medically ill analyst in light of the psychoanalytic community's resistance to mourning and denial of grief. It highlights the various ways that analysts may “need” their patients and their work even more when they are ill or dying. The chapter claims that there is an additional layer of communal and institutional disavowal that heightens the risk of ethical violations under such circumstances. It discusses the tendency to replace what might be effective and useful oversight with perceived kindness and leniency in the hope of “protecting” the reputation and the well-being of the impaired analyst. It argues that members of the analytic community fail to address productively this issue in part because it brings their own mortality to the forefront and gives rise to primitive fantasies and defenses.

Keywords:   therapists, psychoanalysts, illness, professional practice, mourning, denial, grief

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