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AfternessFigures of Following in Modern Thought and Aesthetics$
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Gerhard Richter

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780231157704

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231157704.001.0001

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Afterness and Translation

Afterness and Translation

The Politics of Carrying Across

Chapter:
(p.88) 5 Afterness and Translation
Source:
Afterness
Author(s):

Gerhard Richter

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231157704.003.0005

This chapter examines translation as a form of afterness. It first considers Odo Marquard’s interpretation of Martin Heidegger’s aesthetic gestures, and in particular of the latter’s understanding of Friedrich Schiller. It explores how Marquard implicitly distances himself from Philippe Lacoue-Labarthe’s argument that Heidegger’s “national aestheticism” is a formation of political involvement that is structured, even haunted, by an abiding attachment to techné and its myths. It also discusses the underlying politics in Heidegger’s concept of translation as Übersetzen, or “carrying across,” and the ways in which it is lodged at the core of Heidegger’s philosophy of language. It reads Heidegger’s ideas on translation in light of his 1936/1937 Freiburg seminar on Schiller’s Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Mankind in order to understand how translation provides Heidegger with a privileged paradigm for conceptualizing the problematic relation between a so-called original and the translation commonly thought of as following it in a straightforward sense.

Keywords:   translation, afterness, Odo Marquard, Martin Heidegger, Friedrich Schiller, national aestheticism, Übersetzen, carrying across, Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Mankind, politics

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