Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Imaginal PoliticsImages Beyond Imagination and the Imaginary$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Chiara Bottici

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231157780

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231157780.001.0001

Show Summary Details

From Phantasia to Imagination

From Phantasia to Imagination

Chapter:
(p.15) 1 From Phantasia to Imagination
Source:
Imaginal Politics
Author(s):

Chiara Bottici

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231157780.003.0001

This chapter reconstructs the philosophical ruptures that lie behind the concept of imagination that have led to the coining of an alternative word, the imaginary. In particular, it considers the contrast between the Greek phantasia and the modern imagination. It suggests that the first great rupture in the genealogy of imagination can be summarized as the passage from Greek phantasia to a modern imagination without fantasy. The word imagination derives from imaginatio, the Latin term used to translate the Greek phantasia. The first authors for whom we can speak of a fully fledged theory of phantasia are Plato and Aristotle. The view of phantasia that emerges from certain passages of both Plato and Aristotle is in stark contrast with the view of imagination as unreal that is encapsulated in today's common usage. Plato and Aristotle both root phantasia in sensation. This chapter shows that images (phantasmata) do not only operate during sensation, but continue to operate even when the perception no longer takes place.

Keywords:   imagination, imaginary, phantasia, imaginatio, Plato, Aristotle, sensation, images, perception

Columbia Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .