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Eric WalrondA Life in the Harlem Renaissance and the Transatlantic Caribbean$
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James Davis

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231157841

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231157841.001.0001

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Bradford-on-Avon (1939–1952)

Bradford-on-Avon (1939–1952)

Chapter:
(p.291) 9 Bradford-on-Avon (1939–1952)
Source:
Eric Walrond
Author(s):

James Davis

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231157841.003.0010

This chapter chronicles Walrond's life in Bradford-on-Avon as an evacuee during the onset of World War II. Bradford was classically English, and it appeared to be detached from the rest of the world after a fashion. Walrond found himself the only black person in a town of four hundred residents, despite the large number of evacuees arriving in the village as the war dragged on. Walrond was unusual, one of the few who stayed on after 1940, when most evacuees returned, and of course he was “coloured.” His writing during his twelve years in Bradford is instructive in its treatment of race relations. Many of the difficulties he faced in London persisted, but Bradford lacked the simmering antagonism that characterized the cities and ports.

Keywords:   Bradford-on-Avon, World War II, evacuee, race relations, London

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