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Knock Me Up, Knock Me DownImages of Pregnancy in Hollywood Films$
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Kelly Oliver

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780231161091

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231161091.001.0001

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Academic Feminism Versus Hollywood Feminism

Academic Feminism Versus Hollywood Feminism

How Modest Maternity Becomes Pregnant Glam

(p.20) 1 Academic Feminism Versus Hollywood Feminism
Knock Me Up, Knock Me Down

Kelly Oliver

Columbia University Press

This chapter follows the parallel courses of various feminists'—Simone de Beauvoir, Julia Kristeva, Iris Marion Young—revaluations of pregnant embodiment and Hollywood's changing depictions of pregnancy. It presents developments in feminist thought, science, medicine, and popular film and relates them to the changing attitudes toward pregnant bodies and desires. The concept of pregnant glam not only causes the sexual objectification of the female body, but it has also been putting more pressure on women to “have it all”—careers, babies, a good man, and sexy bodies. The central question here is: can attractive representations of pregnancy also be empowering to women even as they promote traditional family values?

Keywords:   Simone de Beauvoir, Julia Kristeva, Iris Marion Young, pregnant embodiment, pregnant glam, sexual objectification, traditional family values

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