Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Killing the MoonlightModernism in Venice$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jennifer Scappettone

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231164320

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231164320.001.0001

Show Summary Details

From Passéism to Anachronism

From Passéism to Anachronism

Material Histories in Pound’s Venice

Chapter:
(p.196) 4 From Passéism to Anachronism
Source:
Killing the Moonlight
Author(s):

Jennifer Scappettone

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231164320.003.0005

This chapter looks at Ezra Pound's collection of poems about Venice, the place he credited with awakening his interest in “civilization.” His first collection establishes an archaeological process that would inform his entire work: the “mingled chords” drawn “from out the shadows of the past.” The antique cosmopolitan city of Venice offers an archive for these “mingled chords” that remains productive for the duration of Pound's career, although he never settles on a single meaning of the place. From his first collection through multiple phases of The Cantos, Venice appears as a repository of material histories that motivate Pound's open historiography. The chapter examines how Venice inspires Pound to poetic reanimation that challenges both backward- and forward-looking teleological approaches to time—approaches manifested in Gabriele D'Annunzio's restorative nostalgia, Futurism's projected obliteration of the past, and the instrumental historicism of the Fascist ventennio.

Keywords:   Ezra Pound, Venice, The Cantos, Gabriele D' Annunzio, Futurism, Fascist ventennio

Columbia Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .