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Finding Ourselves at the MoviesPhilosophy for a New Generation$
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Paul Kahn

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231164382

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231164382.001.0001

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Philosophy, Democracy, and the Turn to Film

Philosophy, Democracy, and the Turn to Film

Chapter:
(p.5) Chapter 1 Philosophy, Democracy, and the Turn to Film
Source:
Finding Ourselves at the Movies
Author(s):

Paul W. Kahn

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231164382.003.0001

This chapter considers the need for a new course in philosophical inquiry. Philosophy is an academic discipline addressing a professional readership, and therefore, must be an accessible form of self-discovery. Popular films are fine examples of a common object of discourse for philosophical engagement for two reasons: first, films are widely known and obtainable; second, their imaginative resources are responsive to the audience's expectations. Discussions about popular films are, in a way, discussions about the self. The chapter examines the film The Artist (2011) and its themes of redemptive promise of love and the fear of being alone and powerless in changing world, both of which are narrative paths followed by philosophy.

Keywords:   philosophy, philosophical inquiry, self-discovery, popular films, The Artist

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