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Finding Ourselves at the MoviesPhilosophy for a New Generation$
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Paul Kahn

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231164382

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231164382.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Film, Faith, and Love

Chapter:
(p.177) Conclusion
Source:
Finding Ourselves at the Movies
Author(s):

Paul W. Kahn

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231164382.003.0006

This concluding chapter reflects on how the rest of the world forms an image of America through its exported films. It is, however, less noted that this is true internally as well, that films are instrumental in knowing oneself. Watching a movie is a way of renewing contact with the fundamental narrative structures of the social imaginary. These structures are presented in the film The Blind Side (2009), which ties together familial love, faith, and politics. Generally, theaters are not centers of instructive indoctrination, but rather worlds of narrative. As long as human beings trust themselves to film, that faith will be met by love; as a result, contingency is dismissed, reasons supplant causes, and narrative organizes the world.

Keywords:   films, narrative structures, social imaginary, The Blind Side, faith, love

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