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Another Person's PoisonA History of Food Allergy$
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Matthew Smith

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231164849

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231164849.001.0001

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An Immunological Explosion?

An Immunological Explosion?

Chapter:
(p.125) Five An Immunological Explosion?
Source:
Another Person's Poison
Author(s):

Matthew Smith

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231164849.003.0006

This chapter discusses how the schism between food allergists and orthodox allergists was finally made complete by the discovery of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in 1966. For academic immunologists and orthodox allergists, IgE was and is an immunological marker for allergic reactions, proving to them that much of what food allergists had claimed was food allergy was in fact either intolerance or psychosomatic. Although IgE ushered in a new era of scientific respectability for orthodox allergists, it pushed many food allergists to the fringes of medical practice. IgE also made it possible for unscrupulous allergists to market dubious allergy tests, which marginalized food allergists and clinical ecologists even farther.

Keywords:   food allergy, allergies, food allergists, orthodox allergists, immunoglobulin E, IgE

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