Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Another Person's PoisonA History of Food Allergy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Matthew Smith

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231164849

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231164849.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.187) Conclusion
Source:
Another Person's Poison
Author(s):

Matthew Smith

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231164849.003.0008

This concluding chapter begins with a discussion of the lack of medical interest and the paucity of research on the rise of allergy and other immune dysfunctions. It argues that rather than thinking imaginatively or creatively about such diseases, their causes, and what they might denote about our changing relationship with our foods, the environment, or our lifestyles, most clinicians and researchers have expended their energies on defending restrictive dogmas and debating about precise definitions. The chapter suggests that in order to explain the explosion of anaphylactic allergy and other allergic diseases, food allergists and orthodox allergists should look to reconcile their differences and examine food allergy afresh in a more pluralistic, open-minded, and holistic fashion.

Keywords:   food allergy, anaphylactic allergy, allergies, food allergists, orthodox allergists

Columbia Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .