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The Cinema of Steven SoderberghIndie Sex, Corporate Lies, and Digital Videotape$
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Andrew deWaard and R. Colin Tait

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231165518

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231165518.001.0001

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Corporate Revolutionary

Corporate Revolutionary

Soderbergh as Guerrilla Auteur

Chapter:
(p.57) Chapter Three Corporate Revolutionary
Source:
The Cinema of Steven Soderbergh
Author(s):

Andrew deWaard

R. Colin Tait

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231165518.003.0004

This chapter looks at the legacy of Third Cinema and find elements of ‘guerrilla’, ‘imperfect’, and ‘minor’ filmmaking within Soderbergh's vast body of work. The theory and practice of Third Cinema, oppositional to both ‘First Cinema’ (Hollywood spectacle) and ‘Second Cinema’ (European auteur film), sought to establish an alternative mode of filmmaking. Soderbergh has exploited his position as part of the ‘System’ that Third Cinema opposes in order to create challenging, flawed films that use ‘guerrilla’ techniques, alternative modes of production, and political themes that side with the oppressed. These films lie outside the rubric of both traditional Hollywood escapist fare and auteurist self-expression. The dialectical dynamism of Soderbergh's career includes these oppositional stances that require the critic to think beyond evaluative concerns and consider the sheer display of difference in much of his work.

Keywords:   Steven Soderbergh, Third Cinema, guerrilla filmmaking, imperfect filmmaking, film production, political themes, Hollywood, European auteur film

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