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Lady in the DarkIris Barry and the Art of Film$
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Robert Sitton

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231165785

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231165785.001.0001

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“We Enjoyed the War”

“We Enjoyed the War”

Chapter:
(p.17) 2 “We Enjoyed the War”
Source:
Lady in the Dark
Author(s):

Robert Sitton

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231165785.003.0002

This chapter focuses on Iris Barry's life after war broke out in 1914. Iris first took a job as a typist at ten shillings a week in a dismal pen factory, from which she was summarily fired. She then worked at the General Post Office, working in a tiresome clerical job having to do with telephone poles. She transferred to the Ministry of Munitions where she spent her time “typing endless huge sheets of figures” that “went up every night to Winston Churchill personally.” In her spare time Iris continued to write poetry. She also became aware of the domestic effects of World War I, including the use of new paper bills instead of gold as currency and the deaths of the sons of many farmers who fought in the war.

Keywords:   World War I, poetry, clerk, General Post Office, Ministry of Munitions, paper money, gold

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