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Lady in the DarkIris Barry and the Art of Film$
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Robert Sitton

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231165785

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231165785.001.0001

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“Dear Miss Barry”

“Dear Miss Barry”

Chapter:
(p.23) 3 “Dear Miss Barry”
Source:
Lady in the Dark
Author(s):

Robert Sitton

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231165785.003.0003

This chapter details Iris Barry's life following the death of her grandmother in 1916. She was working as a shorthand typist when she received an inquiry about her poetry from the American writer, Ezra Pound, then living in London. Pound noticed some of Iris' poems in the British publication Poetry and Drama and wrote to her on April 2, 1916, asking if she had any unpublished poems. Pound was in the process of gathering up verses for an American publication called Poetry and was interested in her work. Iris responded enthusiastically, sending along a “suitcaseful” of poems and a request for criticism. Thus began a tutorial by correspondence, which became the genesis of later works by Pound—the essay, “How to Read” (1931), and the books, The ABC of Reading (1934) and Guide to Kulchur (1952).

Keywords:   grandmother, Ezra Pound, poems, poetry

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