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Lady in the DarkIris Barry and the Art of Film$
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Robert Sitton

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231165785

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231165785.001.0001

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Final Breaks

Final Breaks

Chapter:
(p.397) 41 Final Breaks
Source:
Lady in the Dark
Author(s):

Robert Sitton

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231165785.003.0041

This chapter describes Iris Barry's life following her return to the Austin house in Fayence. No longer able to get along with her son and daughter-in-law in London, Iris returned to the Austin house in 1964 where she embarked on a final effort to get along with Pierre, at least insofar as he might be useful in maintaining the Austin house. They lingered together in a loose liaison. Kerroux also attempted to use French law to take possession of the first two floors of the Austin house. He invoked a French legalism known as “droit de commerce,” by which the operator of a business has prima facie claim to occupancy of business premises. Kerroux's claim proved baseless, but it threatened a relationship with the Austin family that Iris had come to rely upon. The Austin house had been her refuge since 1954, and at the moment no alternatives presented themselves. This dilemma, however, was only followed by a greater one, Iris's final illness.

Keywords:   Iris Barry, Pierre Kerroux, Austin house, droit de commerce

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