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Lady in the DarkIris Barry and the Art of Film$
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Robert Sitton

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231165785

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231165785.001.0001

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Alan Porter

Alan Porter

Chapter:
(p.83) 7 Alan Porter
Source:
Lady in the Dark
Author(s):

Robert Sitton

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231165785.003.0007

This chapter details Iris Barry's life following her marriage to American poet Alan Porter on October 8, 1923. Twenty-four-year-old Porter was just out of Oxford and writing for the Spectator. Through Porter and his Oxford friends, Iris was introduced to St. Loe Strachey, proprietor of the Spectator. Strachey's son, John, a film enthusiast, thought that the magazine should take notice of films. In the early 1920s Porter's Oxford friend, Bertram Higgins, was writing short reviews of motion pictures, but decided he could not continue and turned the job over to Iris, who had been writing occasional criticism for the publication. Thus began her long and consequential association with film and film criticism. She became what Ivor Montagu later called the “first film critic on a serious British journal,” meaning the first to criticize rather than merely to promote, motion pictures.

Keywords:   Alan Porter, marriage, poem, Spectator magazine, film review, film critic

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