Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Greening of AsiaThe Business Case for Solving Asia’s Environmental Emergency$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Mark Clifford

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231166089

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231166089.001.0001

Show Summary Details

Blowin’ in the Wind

Blowin’ in the Wind

Chapter:
(p.44) 2 Blowin’ in the Wind
Source:
The Greening of Asia
Author(s):

Mark L. Clifford

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231166089.003.0002

This chapter discusses wind power, which is a relatively new energy source. Like solar power, wind power relies on natural forces to produce electricity. Unlike fossil fuels, wind does not produce air pollution or carbon dioxide emissions. Technological advances, together with a growing demand for turbines, have brought about a dramatic reduction in the price of wind power worldwide. This era of inexpensive wind power is the result of a new generation of higher-capacity turbines that can produce substantially more electricity than their predecessors. In the five years from 2008 until 2012, wind power installations more than doubled, approaching 300 GW of installed capacity. At the end of 2012, there were 225,000 wind turbines producing power, generating about 2.6 percent of global electricity.

Keywords:   wind power, natural forces, electricity, fossil fuels, wind turbines, wind power installations

Columbia Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .