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The Dalai Lama and the Emperor of ChinaA Political History of the Tibetan Institution of Reincarnation$
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Peter Schwieger

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231168526

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231168526.001.0001

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The Aftermath

The Aftermath

Chapter:
(p.209) 7 The Aftermath
Source:
The Dalai Lama and the Emperor of China
Author(s):

Peter Schwieger

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231168526.003.0008

This chapter describes events following the collapse of the Qing Dynasty and the proclamation of the Republic of China in 1912. Although the thirteenth Dalai Lama attempted to rule Tibet on his own authority, the new Chinese government upheld China's claims to Tibet. The Dalai Lama's efforts to strengthen the independent position of the Tibetan government through reforms and diplomacy were obstructed by the clergy of the great Gelukpa monasteries, Drepung, Sera, and Ganden. In their opinion, the reforms desired by the Dalai Lama jeopardized the traditional system of the “union of religion and politics.” Since the 1990s, the policy of the Chinese government in Beijing with respect to Tibetan reincarnations has been to try to revert to the methods of control established by the Qing.

Keywords:   Qing Dynasty, Republic of China, Tibet, Dalai Lama, reincarnation

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