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Nicholas MiraculousThe Amazing Career of the Redoubtable Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler$
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Michael Rosenthal

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231174213

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231174213.001.0001

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“Mr. Butler’s Asylum”

“Mr. Butler’s Asylum”

Chapter:
(p.218) Chapter Ten “Mr. Butler’s Asylum”
Source:
Nicholas Miraculous
Author(s):

Michael Rosenthal

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231174213.003.0011

This chapter discusses Nicholas Murray Butler's campaign for peace and international cooperation as well as his dispute with two faculty members of Columbia University, James McKeen Cattell and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana. In July 1912, Butler traveled to Europe to receive honors and preach the gospel of international understanding. In Paris to be named a Commander of the Legion of Honor, he talked about the new vision of international unity taking over the world. The high point of his trip was a lunch with Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany. This chapter considers Butler's role as purveyor of the international mind and minister without portfolio for world peace, courtesy of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. It also examines Butler's system of international cooperation; Columbia's commitment to World War I effort and its faculty's support of the American military involvement in the war; and the expulsions of Cattell and Dana from Columbia.

Keywords:   peace, Nicholas Murray Butler, international cooperation, faculty, Columbia University, James McKeen Cattell, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Dana, Europe, World War I, Kaiser Wilhelm II

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