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Little Magazine, World Form$
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Eric Bulson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780231179768

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231179768.001.0001

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Little exiled magazines

Little exiled magazines

Chapter:
(p.151) No. 4 Little exiled magazines
Source:
Little Magazine, World Form
Author(s):

Eric Bulson

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231179768.003.0005

Chapter Four looks at some of the most prominent “exile” magazines produced by British and American editors who fled to countries across Europe to combat this increased Anglo-American provincialism. Broom (1921-24), Secession (1922-24), Gargoyle (1921-22), The Exile (1927-28), Tambour (1929-30), This Quarter (1925), the transatlantic review (1924-25), and transition (1927-38) represent a collective attempt to establish an international system for production and distribution that worked in reverse. Instead of producing magazines in England or America, they published them in European cities and had them transported back across the Atlantic Ocean and the English Channel. This story about the “little exiled magazine,” as Malcolm Cowley called it, doesn’t end here. In the 1930s and 1940s, it became a lifeline for so many of the critics and writers, who fled the Fascists and Nazis, and came to include anti-fascist communist magazines such as Das Wort (a German language magazine printed in Russia) and Surrealist magazines such as VVV and Dyn (one printed in New York City, the other in Mexico City). Taking the long view of the little magazine’s exilic history and geography allows us to foreground a political reality that is so often ignored or forgotten.

Keywords:   Little magazine, Antifascism, Exile, Literary distribution

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