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In Defense of Religious Moderation$
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William Egginton

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780231148788

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231148788.001.0001

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Dogmatic Atheism

Dogmatic Atheism

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Dogmatic Atheism
Source:
In Defense of Religious Moderation
Author(s):

William Egginton

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231148788.003.0001

This chapter critiques the sense of certainty of atheists in defying the fundamentalism of religion. The problem with all atheistic criticisms on religion today is that while atheists are right in decrying the “evils” of religion, their sense of certainty is fundamentalism itself. For instance, Christopher Hitchens, penned in his book God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything that “religion even at its meekest has to admit that what it is proposing is a ‘total’ solution, in which faith must be to some extent blind, and in which all aspects of the private and public life must be submitted to a permanent higher supervision.” However, his argument is flawed since religious moderates have no interest in total solutions of any kind, and they severely doubt that any such solution is possible or desirable. Moreover, what Hitchens has discussed indicates another form of fundamentalism.

Keywords:   Christopher Hitchens, God Is Not Great, religious moderates, fundamentalism, atheists, total solution

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