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Fossil Mammals of AsiaNeogene Biostratigraphy and Chronology$
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Mikael Fortelius, Xiaoming Wang, and Lawrence Flynn

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231150125

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231150125.001.0001

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Late Miocene (Turolian) Vertebrate Faunas from Southern European Russia

Late Miocene (Turolian) Vertebrate Faunas from Southern European Russia

Chapter:
(p.538) Chapter 24 Late Miocene (Turolian) Vertebrate Faunas from Southern European Russia
Source:
Fossil Mammals of Asia
Author(s):

Vadim V. Titov

Alexey S. Tesakov

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231150125.003.0024

This chapter investigates Late Miocene (Turolian) vertebrate faunas from southern European Russia. Compared with a relatively rich and continuous record of Late Miocene land mammals in the southwestern parts of the North Black Sea region, the fossil record of more eastern areas is very patchy and relatively unstudied. The rare occurrence of fossil vertebrates is due in part to widespread marine deposits of the Eastern Paratethys and a limited distribution of synchronous continental sediments. Systematic excavations at a number of previously known and newly discovered localities revealed sporadic remains of predominantly large mammals that, based on their composition, are attributable to the Turolian European Land Mammal Age. Most faunas have strong European affinities, indicated, for example, by mastodons and the lagomorph Prolagus. Aside from species and genera that have large trans-Palaearctic ranges, the presence of lophodont lophocricetines (Sibirosminthus), microtoid hamsters, and camels (Paracamelus) indicate immigrations from Asia.

Keywords:   fauna, Late Miocene, vertebrates, Russia, land mammals, Turolian, Europe, Land Mammal Age, mastodons

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