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Drinking HistoryFifteen Turning Points in the Making of American Beverages$
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Andrew Smith

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231151177

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231151177.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

Prologue

Prologue

Chapter:
(p.1) Prologue
Source:
Drinking History
Author(s):

Andrew F. Smith

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231151177.003.0017

This prologue describes beverages during prehistoric times. For most of human history, people took water directly from rivers, streams, lakes, and springs. When humans settled down into communities, they dug wells, collected rainwater, and constructed aqueducts to ensure an adequate supply for their personal needs and to support agriculture. Groups in particular areas developed preferences for beverages with specific flavorings and characteristics: coffee berries in East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula; grapes and grains from the Middle East; tea leaves, citrus, and rice from China; hops and herbs from Europe; sugarcane and spices from South and Southeast Asia; apples from inner Asia; sassafras, cactus, and berries from North America; kola nuts from Africa; and maize, cocoa, and vanilla from Central America.

Keywords:   water, beverage history, prehistoric times, coffee berries, tea leaves

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