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The Origins of Schizophrenia$
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Alan Brown and Paul Patterson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780231151245

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231151245.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 05 August 2021

DISC1

DISC1

A New Paradigm for Schizophrenia and Biological Psychiatry

Chapter:
(p.365) Chapter 14 DISC1
Source:
The Origins of Schizophrenia
Author(s):

David Porteous

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231151245.003.0014

This chapter focuses on the Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia gene (DISC1) as a causal genetic risk factor for schizophrenia and related psychiatric disorders. DISC1 is responsible for encoding proteins with multiple coiled motifs, which are located in the nucleus, cytoplasm, and mitochondria. Scientists report evidence that DISC1 appears to play a role in disorders such as schizoaffective disorder, autism spectrum disorder, and Alzheimer's disease. Brain imaging studies also link common genetic variants of DISC1 to variations in hippocampal and cortical function. The chapter concludes that the example of DISC1 and other candidate genes identified by molecular cytogenetic methods points to a high level of locus and allelic heterogeneity in schizophrenia.

Keywords:   Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia, gene, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, Alzheimer's disease

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