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Alienation$
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Rahel Jaeggi

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231151986

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231151986.001.0001

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Marx and Heidegger

Marx and Heidegger

Two Versions of Alienation Critique

Chapter:
(p.11) 2 Marx and Heidegger
Source:
Alienation
Author(s):

Rahel Jaeggi

, Frederick Neuhouser, Alan E. Smith
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231151986.003.0002

This chapter discusses alienation's theoretical starting points and how they are addressed in Karl Marx's theory and in Martin Heidegger's existential ontology. In order to reconstruct the concept of alienation, this chapter explores the key differences between the two positions—which can be traced back to (among other things) the difference between Marx's focus on a paradigm of production and Heidegger's understanding of “being-in-the-world.” It first considers Marx's views about the “national-economic fact” of alienated labor and the dimensions of alienation before articulating the concept of labor in relation to Marx's anthropology, or theory of human nature, along with the productivist turn in his concept of alienation. It then evaluates Heidegger's analysis of being-in-the-world in relation to his critique of objectification or reification and concludes by outlining two aspects of self-alienation that can be formulated in Heidegger's vocabulary.

Keywords:   alienation, Karl Marx, Martin Heidegger, existential ontology, production, being-in-the-world, labor, objectification, reification, self-alienation

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