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No Return, No RefugeRites and Rights in Minority Repatriation$
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Elazar Barkan and Howard Adelman

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780231153362

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231153362.001.0001

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The Rites of Rights

The Rites of Rights

Chapter:
(p.1) [1] The Rites of Rights
Source:
No Return, No Refuge
Author(s):

Howard Adelman

Elazar Barkan

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231153362.003.0001

This chapter clarifies the nature, extent, and applicability of the right of internally displaced persons (IDPs) and ethnic minorities to their return to their countries. The right of return has a solid foundation based on a series of conventions and declarations. First and foremost is Article 13(2) of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), which states: “Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country.” Their return also concerns rights to redeem lost property, the differences between individual and collective rights, the competition between and among different types of rights, the conflict between prioritizing rights or needs, and the more general issue of refugee and IDP protection. Viewed in an inclusive manner, the moral support for repatriation is not limited to a formal state or nationality, but is rather wide-ranging.

Keywords:   internally displaced persons, ethnic minorities, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, right of return, right to leave

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