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No Return, No RefugeRites and Rights in Minority Repatriation$
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Elazar Barkan and Howard Adelman

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780231153362

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231153362.001.0001

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Palestinians and the Right of Return

Palestinians and the Right of Return

Chapter:
(p.189) [8] Palestinians and the Right of Return
Source:
No Return, No Refuge
Author(s):

Howard Adelman

Elazar Barkan

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231153362.003.0008

This chapter discusses the Palestinian uprooting, and the formation of the United Nations Relief Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) to depict the origins of the claim for a right of return for Palestinians, and then traces the evolution of the politics of the right of return into the present. In the immediate aftermath of World War II, the international system failed to solve the Jewish refugees' problem. This was followed by the 1948 War between the Zionists in Palestine and local Arab Palestinians, which expanded to include other Arab states. Hundreds of thousands of Palestinians were uprooted and fled due to fear of dying in the war. As the number of Palestinian refugees grew, a United Nations relief effort known as UNRWA was mounted in November 1948 and became operational in January 1949.

Keywords:   United Nations Relief Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, UNRWA, World War II, Jewish refugees, Palestinian refugees, Zionists

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