Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Critical ChildrenThe Use of Childhood in Ten Great Novels$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Richard Locke

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231157834

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231157834.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 15 June 2021

Philip Roth’s Performing Loudmouth

Philip Roth’s Performing Loudmouth

Alexander Portnoy

Chapter:
(p.173) 7 Philip Roth’s Performing Loudmouth
Source:
Critical Children
Author(s):

Richard Locke

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231157834.003.0007

This chapter discusses the character of Alexander Portnoy, a model child who harbors a guilty secret, in Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint (1969). The novel arose from Roth's four abandoned projects, namely The Jewboy, The Nice Jewish Boy, Portrait of the Artist, and an untitled monologue. It employs a nonlinear, free-associative psychoanalytic monologue rather than the usual linear novel of childhood and adolescence, using the first person point of view to follow Portnoy's provincial infancy and adolescence to cosmopolitan life as a man about town. It demonstrates how Portnoy's social and erotic expectations have destroyed him, exposing official manners and morals as frauds.

Keywords:   Alexander Portnoy, Philip Roth, Portnoy's Complaint, psychoanalytic monologue, social expectations, erotic expectations

Columbia Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .