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Eric WalrondA Life in the Harlem Renaissance and the Transatlantic Caribbean$
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James Davis

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780231157841

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231157841.001.0001

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The New Negro (1923–1926)

The New Negro (1923–1926)

Chapter:
(p.83) 4 The New Negro (1923–1926)
Source:
Eric Walrond
Author(s):

James Davis

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231157841.003.0005

This chapter discusses the advancement of Walrond's career into mainstream literature, due both to white patronage and the extensive support of the Negro community. The New Negro movement had played a significant role in his early success—as a matter of fact, Walrond's hopeful transition from journalism to fiction writing was heralded in 1928 by the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, which named him among the journalists who midwifed “the birth of the so-called New Negro” in literature. His white patrons, notably Edna Worthley Underwood and William McFee, were also invaluable as Walrond crossed into the mainstream—among the first African-American writers of his generation to do so.

Keywords:   New Negro, New Negro movement, fiction writing, literature, white patronage, Negro community, African-American writers

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