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Women in IraqPast Meets Present$
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Noga Efrati

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780231158145

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231158145.001.0001

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Gender Discourse and Discontent

Gender Discourse and Discontent

Activism Unraveled

Chapter:
(p.111) 4 Gender Discourse and Discontent
Source:
Women in Iraq
Author(s):

Noga Efrati

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231158145.003.0004

This chapter delves deeper into the women's movement in Iraq during the Hashemite period. It suggests that there were two main reasons why the full scale of women's response against the constitutional monarchy was difficult to trace. The first is connected with circumstances of the time—that is, with the government's censoring of the women's movement. The second, however, is rooted in accounts portraying the history of the women's movement, provided by Iraqi women activists and their later reproduction in contemporary scholarly literature published in English. The chapter argues that the early history of the women's movement in Iraq remains little known because the two key organizations involved in the movement—the Iraqi Women's Union, which was harshly sanctioned by the regime, and the underground League for the Defense of Women's Rights, produced two competing narratives of the women's movement.

Keywords:   women's movement, Iraq, Hashemite period, censorship, Iraqi women activists, Iraqi Women's Union, League for the Defense of Women's Rights

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