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Knock Me Up, Knock Me DownImages of Pregnancy in Hollywood Films$
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Kelly Oliver

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780231161091

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231161091.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 13 June 2021

“What’s the Worst that can Happen?”

“What’s the Worst that can Happen?”

Techno-Pregnancies Versus Real Pregnancies

Chapter:
5 “What’s the Worst that can Happen?”
Source:
Knock Me Up, Knock Me Down
Author(s):

Kelly Oliver

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231161091.003.0006

This chapter continues the examination of anxieties over new reproductive technologies as they appear in Hollywood film. Pregnancy films illustrate that whether or not the protagonists resort to assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) or in vitro fertilization (IVF), the worst that can happen is that they do not conceive by the end of the film. The chapter reviews themes of shame associated with ART pregnancies; ideals of romantic pregnancies over technological ones (techno-pregnancy); and images of choice in discussions of the so-called “designer babies,” including monstrous births, various forms of miscegenation and hybrids, and uncertainties over paternity and maternity.

Keywords:   splice film, assisted reproductive technologies, in vitro fertilization, romantic pregnancies, techno-pregnancy, designer babies, miscegenation

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