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Democracy and Islam in Indonesia$
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Alfred Stepan and Mirjam Künkler

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231161916

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231161916.001.0001

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How Pluralist Democracy Became the Consensual Discourse Among Secular and Nonsecular Muslims in Indonesia

How Pluralist Democracy Became the Consensual Discourse Among Secular and Nonsecular Muslims in Indonesia

Chapter:
(p.53) 3 How Pluralist Democracy Became the Consensual Discourse Among Secular and Nonsecular Muslims in Indonesia
Source:
Democracy and Islam in Indonesia
Author(s):

Mirjam Künkler

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231161916.003.0003

This chapter addresses the crucial question of how democratic attitudes emerged within the major Muslim civil society groups in Indonesia, the Nahdlatul Ulama (NU) and the Muhammadiyah. Key religious actors and organizations put Islam and democracy on the public agenda and in the process contributed both to the erosion of the authoritarian regime and to the building of democracy by their actions and, as hypothesized, actually had a positive effect on eroding the authoritarian regime and supporting a democratic transition. These thinkers had remained in constant dialogue with other public debate infrastructures, creating a wide network of publication and information dissemination that spread from the grassroots level toward the nation's diverse populace. Additionally, the ideas frequently dispensed were the products of both traditional Islamic education and modernist studies of philosophy and theology, ensuring that Islamic dialogue would be clearly expressed and applicable to facets of daily life.

Keywords:   Nahdlatul Ulama, Muhammadiyah, democratic attitudes, civil society groups, traditional Islamic education, philosophy, theology, democratic transition, authoritarian regime

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