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Creamy and CrunchyAn Informal History of Peanut Butter, the All-American Food$
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Jon Krampner

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231162333

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231162333.001.0001

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Where Are the Peanut Butters of Yesteryear?

Where Are the Peanut Butters of Yesteryear?

Chapter:
(p.220) Nineteen Where Are the Peanut Butters of Yesteryear?
Source:
Creamy and Crunchy
Author(s):

Jon Krampner

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231162333.003.0019

This chapter examines peanut butter brands which have disappeared from the U.S. market. The varieties of peanut butter available have expanded in recent years, but the peanut butter industry, like many sectors of the American economy, has become more concentrated. The numbers of peanut farmers, shellers, manufacturers, brands, and small independent factories have all declined. Many brands have fallen by the wayside in the more than 100 years since peanut butter was first developed, including regional stalwarts Dr. Schindler's (Baltimore and Washington, DC), Robb Ross (Sioux City, Iowa), Toner's Radiant Roast (Denver), Meadors Old Timey (South Carolina), and even the namesake brand of peanut butter pioneer George Bayle (St. Louis). Today Jif, Skippy, and Peter Pan dominate a highly concentrated peanut butter market, with Smart Balance and Planters rounding out the top tier. Perhaps the largest plant outside of the Big Three that is still making peanut butter is Kroger's Tara Foods plant in Albany, Georgia. New growth of the peanut butter industry will require a strong farm economy, but that may be in jeopardy in years to come.

Keywords:   peanut butter, Kroger, Tara Foods, peanut butter industry, peanut farmers, shellers, manufacturers, brands, factories, farm economy

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