Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Deaths in VeniceThe Cases of Gustav von Aschenbach$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Philip Kitcher

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231162647

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231162647.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 20 June 2021

Beauty

Beauty

Chapter:
(p.61) Two Beauty
Source:
Deaths in Venice
Author(s):

Philip Kitcher

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231162647.003.0002

This chapter focuses on Gustav von Aschenbach, the main character in Death in Venice. It asks: Does he succeed in fitting the disparate elements of his identity together? Is his life invalidated by his capitulation to the lure of beauty? Must the artist inevitably succumb to that lure? For Mann, these were crucial questions, and the creation of Aschenbach was part of his long exploration of them, part of his lifelong endeavor to put himself on trial. The chapter suggests that the elaborate trappings of Death in Venice, the echoes of Nietzsche and Schopenhauer, allusions to Greek mythology and play with Socratic dialogues, are disguises Mann used to mask a more basic story about the social distortion of sexuality and its costs. Freed from the conventional prejudices Mann accurately ascribed to his contemporaries, readers today can recognize the novella for what it is.

Keywords:   Gustav von Aschenbach, Thomas Mann, Death in Venice, citizen, artist, virtue, beauty, sexuality

Columbia Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .