Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Company and the ShogunThe Dutch Encounter with Tokugawa Japan$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Adam Clulow

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780231164283

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231164283.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Planting the Flag in Asia

Planting the Flag in Asia

Chapter:
(p.205) Chapter Six Planting the Flag in Asia
Source:
The Company and the Shogun
Author(s):

Adam Clulow

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231164283.003.0007

This chapter discusses the European claims to sovereignty over territories in Asia. The conflict over the bay of Tayouan provides a rare case example of a clash played out between an Asian state and a European overseas enterprise over rights to a nonaligned space. The result was yet more frustration for the Dutch East India Company, which discovered that carefully constructed arguments about legal rights yielded no benefit when deployed before Bakufu officials who shared none of the same assumptions. As these points suggests, the conflict over Tayouan can best be understood as a clash between two world orders. On the one side was a distinctively European model of direct sovereignty over colonial possessions, and on the other was a hierarchical model of foreign relations organized around the voluntary submission of tribute and justified in those terms.

Keywords:   Tayouan, sovereignty, Asia, Bakufu officials, Dutch East India Company, European model, hierarchical model, foreign relations

Columbia Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .