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Vital ConversationsImproving Communication Between Doctors and Patients$
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Dennis Rosen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231164443

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231164443.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 13 May 2021

Reconciling Different Worldviews

Reconciling Different Worldviews

Chapter:
(p.141) 6 Reconciling Different Worldviews
Source:
Vital Conversations
Author(s):

Dennis Rosen

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231164443.003.0006

This chapter examines the effects of physicians' bias and stigma. Implicit bias, of which the holder is unaware, and explicit bias, of which he is, can both influence what treatments the physician offers to which patients, with the result that some receive suboptimal care relative to others being treated for the same conditions by the same provider. In some situations, such as that of HIV patients, the specific disease that brings patients to seek care from the physician can itself be a source of negative physician bias through the larger context of sickness. Out of 223 HIV patients interviewed, 26 percent reported that at least one health-care provider had seemed uncomfortable with them, treated them in an inferior manner, and preferred to avoid serving them altogether. More than twice as many of those who felt stigmatized also reported difficulties in accessing medical care compared to those who did not.

Keywords:   physician bias, physician stigma, implicit bias, explicit bias, suboptimal care, HIV patients

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