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Beyond SinologyChinese Writing and the Scripts of Culture$
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Andrea Bachner

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231164528

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231164528.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 15 June 2021

Corpographies

Corpographies

Chapter:
(p.19) 1 Corpographies
Source:
Beyond Sinology
Author(s):

David Der-wei Wang

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231164528.003.0001

This chapter explores how the human body becomes a metaphor for, a carrier and wielder of, and matter shaped by the sinograph. It first analyzes the links between Chinese script and materiality under the signs of death and violence: from the equation of death and the sinograph by the Chinese language reformer Hu Yuzhi, to the fetishistic invention of Chinese as disruptive of signification in Western thought (Julia Kristeva, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Jacques Lacan, Salvador Elizondo). It then highlights a new interest in connecting bodies and cultural identity in a symbolic national calligraphy through an analysis of the bodyscripts in design and advertisement in the context of the Beijing Olympics and of the pedagogy of writing in Zhang Yimou's film Hero (Yingxiong).

Keywords:   human body, sinograph, Chinese script, national calligraphy, materiality, Chinese writing, bodyscript, pedagogy, Zhang Yimou, Hu Yuzhi

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