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DMZ CrossingPerforming Emotional Citizenship Along the Korean Border$
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Suk-Young Kim

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231164825

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231164825.001.0001

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Divided Screen, Divided Paths

Divided Screen, Divided Paths

Chapter:
(p.43) 2 Divided Screen, Divided Paths
Source:
DMZ Crossing
Author(s):

Suk-Young Kim

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231164825.003.0002

This chapter presents a double feature, the 1965 South Korean feature film The DMZ and the 1975 North Korean feature film The Fates of Geumhui and Eunhui. Both films let the tragic separation of families unravel on the haunted stage of the demilitarized zone (DMZ), where life and death intersect. For divided families, having to carry on after being uprooted from their hometown and family network is akin to living an incomplete life in the past continuous, where part of them died upon their separation from the inseparable. Both films feature siblings whose lives and deaths intersect and drift away while crossing that crucial line, capturing the shifting rhetoric toward people of the other side as separate from their failed regime, reflecting and anticipating the subtle changes in the political and cultural climate of the inter-Korean relationship in the 1960s and 1970s.

Keywords:   The DMZ, The Fates of Geumhui and Eunhui, separation of families, feature film, inter-Korean relationship, Korean demilitarized zone

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