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Dreaming of CinemaSpectatorship, Surrealism, and the Age of Digital Media$
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Adam Lowenstein

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231166577

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231166577.001.0001

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Interactive Spectatorship

Interactive Spectatorship

Gaming, Mimicry, and Art Cinema: Between Un chien andalou and eXistenZ

Chapter:
(p.43) 2 Interactive Spectatorship
Source:
Dreaming of Cinema
Author(s):

Adam Lowenstein

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231166577.003.0002

This chapter claims that cinema, while not as interactive a medium as video games, still provides a valuable example for theorizing interactivity as embodied stimulation—an example that devises more specific kinds of interactivity that associates new and old media. It analyzes eXistenZ (1999), a film incorporating questions of cinema as digital gaming in explaining how cinema displays the potential for embodied collaboration between artist and audience. The surrealist commitment to games involving embodiment is also present in the film Un chien andalou (1929), with its depictions of assault on spectator vision; and in the writings of Roger Caillois, whose research of mimicry suggests how games can combine surrealist theory and practice.

Keywords:   cinema, video games, interactivity, eXistenZ, Un chien andalou, Roger Caillois, mimicry

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