Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Guilty Knowledge, Guilty PleasureThe Dirty Art of Poetry$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

William Logan

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231166867

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231166867.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM COLUMBIA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.columbia.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Minnesota Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CUPSO for personal use.date: 21 June 2021

Verse Chronicle

Verse Chronicle

Guys and Dove

Chapter:
(p.223) Verse Chronicle
Source:
Guilty Knowledge, Guilty Pleasure
Author(s):

William Logan

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231166867.003.0019

This chapter reviews Mark Strand's Almost Invisible, Geoffrey Hill's Odi Barbare (Barbaric Odes), Vladimir Nabokov's Selected Poems, and The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry edited by Rita Dove. Strand's prose poems in Almost Invisible tilt toward contrived fables and dopey meditations, at worst self-indulgent musings after the imagination has shut down for the day and at best Kafka lite. Hill's Odi Barbare is a crabbed sequence of outbursts and meditations, fifty-two sections cast in Sapphic quatrains. Selected Poems supplements Nabokov's own selection, published in Poems and Problems (1970), with two dozen or so poems from Russian previously untranslated and some uncollected poems in English. The Russian poems have been rendered into a kind of mock Victorian by the novelist's late son, Dmitri. Dove's The Penguin Anthology of Twentieth-Century American Poetry is an inadequate portrait of American poetry of the late century. Instead, it might be called an expression of contemporary anxieties about poetry.

Keywords:   poems, poetry, Mark Strand, Geoffrey Hill, Vladimir Nabokov, Rita Dove, reviews

Columbia Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .