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The Cinema of Alexander SokurovFigures of Paradox$
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Jeremi Szaniawski

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780231167352

Published to Columbia Scholarship Online: November 2015

DOI: 10.7312/columbia/9780231167352.001.0001

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Taurus

Taurus

‘Father, where art thou?’

Chapter:
(p.156) Chapter Ten Taurus
Source:
The Cinema of Alexander Sokurov
Author(s):

Jeremi Szaniawski

Publisher:
Columbia University Press
DOI:10.7312/columbia/9780231167352.003.0011

This chapter considers Taurus (2001). Taurus is the second instalment in Sokurov's tetralogy dedicated to men of power (and to power itself). Moloch, Sokurov's earlier film, and Taurus resonate with one another on a variety of levels. But whereas Moloch shows Adolf Hitler still at the height of his power, Taurus presents a crippled Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, his right side paralyzed following a stroke. Themes of solitude, alienation, and madness, which loomed large in Moloch, are all prominent again here, but in a different, mellower, more melancholy mode: fear and desire have abandoned the screen. Taurus also proves every bit as grotesque as Moloch. The film is about destiny as set forth at birth, about the Sokurovian circles of fate, existence, and becoming. In the end, not much seems to have transpired in the course of Taurus.

Keywords:   Russia, Taurus, power, Moloch, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, solitude, grotesque, destiny

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